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Introducing… Sanctuary

For many participants in this crazy and amazing experiment in community that we call Burning Seed, the experience - both for new arrivals (Burgins) or veterans - can sometimes be seriously overwhelming. The contents of a challenging workshop, an intense conversation, an inebriate evening or the sheer over-stimulation of the environment can each bring their own challenges. 

There are things you can do to prepare for having a GREAT experience: reading the Survival Guide; planning your party; having a good crew to support each other; and a sense of community and civic responsibility - all these things can all make the difference if you want to get the most out of your Burn.

Things don’t always go to plan though; and for those times where you can’t find your flow - you’re tired, partied out, anxious and overwhelmed or you’re partying a bit too hard - there is a brand new crew on the Paddock - Sanctuary.

Helping You Find Your Burn

Girlface is Team Lead for Seed’s inaugural Sanctuary. She says the idea is to create a space where people can come to receive support and guidance if they’re feeling challenged.

“It may be surprising but it’s common for people to feel disconnected at a Burn, not feel like they fit in - they might look around and feel like everyone else is having a great time and that can amplify anxieties or other feelings - it’s OK to feel that - it’s a real and normal human response.

“We’re creating Sanctuary to help people deal with this and get back on their feet through helping them draw on their inner strengths and encouraging them to find their own unique way to Burn.

“The idea of consent and intention stretches beyond sexual intimacy -we want to encourage people to pop by Sanctuary and learn about strategies for safer ways to party and enjoy the enhanced environment at Seed.

“We are an open and inclusive community and people need to feel cool about expressing themselves in the safe and non judgemental environment we collectively create,” Girlface says.

Making Connections

“I was working with the amazing PEER Rangers last year and we supported quite a few first time Burners who were not really familiar with the experience of how it all works at a Burn.

“They saw people getting into the whole radical expression thing and felt kind of disconnected - we talked them through it, let them know that there’s no judgement, that their Burn experience is all about what they want to make it.

“It was so great to see those same Burners the next day with massive smiles on their faces - they made it through the issues, put their anxieties aside and were having a wonderful, magical time - that’s so rewarding for me.

“Sanctuary will be working alongside the broader amazing Seed community to assist those who might be feeling disconnected," Girlface says.

Partying Safe

Girlface says the Sanctuary crew also have a role to educate and advise people in advance of the event to help them avoid finding themselves in the situation where they need Sanctuary.

“If there’s one thing to remember when hitting the Paddock it’s to know when to Slow down, stop, support each other & seek help:

  1. SLOW down, pace yourself, take it easy
  2. If you feel like you’re losing some control or going too far, then STOP
  3. Give SUPPORT to your mates & the rest of the community if you can see others struggling
  4. SEEK HELP - that’s where Sanctuary comes in (alongside Rangers, PEERS & Medics)

“As soon as anyone comes into Sanctuary - night or day - there will be someone to greet them and let them know what kind of support is available,” says Girlface

“We welcome anyone at Sanctuary but we would prefer it if you don’t need to come see us!”

To help make this happen...

  1. Be prepared - if you’re out to party make sure you have food, water and all you need
  2. Be aware of your personal limitations - know your boundaries
  3. Don’t be afraid to say NO - if you’re offered something you don’t have to take it
  4. Look out for your mates & the wider community - take care of them if they’re partying too hard
  5. Familiarise yourself with Theme Camp spaces where you can take it easy

Round the Clock Support

Girlface says Sanctuary will operate around the clock during Seed to provide support to participants who are feeling overwhelmed, challenged and disconnected.

“This is a new social experiment for most new arrivals and the Sanctuary crew will be working alongside Rangers, Peer and Medics to support people through that experience.

“If you are not feeling safe, if you’re feeling anxious, disconnected, confused and in need of support. If you’re friend is a bit too intoxicated or emotional and you’re not comfortable leaving them alone at camp, then please don’t, bring them down to the Sanctuary space.”

Sanctuary needs YOU

“We’re participants like anyone else with a caring and empathetic way of looking at the world and we need more people to help us crew during the event,” says Girlface.

“If people are keen to contribute in any way we really want to hear from them - you don’t need professional skills or any experience as such - just to be empathetic, caring, non-judgemental and passionate about providing support for people in times of need.

“We’re planning to provide some pre-event training, potentially tying up with Ranger training events in in Melbourne, hopefully Sydney and onsite.

“Shifts on-site will be around the clock and between 4-6 hours each and crewed by a shift lead together with between 2-4 crew depending on how busy it is - the Team Lead and 2iCs will be on call throughout.

If you want to sign up to join the Sanctuary crew visit the website and let them know. As well as filling in your crew application form, if you have any questions please shoot them an email at sanctuary@burningseed.com.

sanctuary

Sanctuary: A new crew on the Paddock

 

 

 

 

 

 

Love

There's support all around you but if you need Sanctuary it's there

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jayman

That first Burn can be pretty overwhelming

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PEER Rangers & a New Seed Sanctuary

By Jacqueline LadySparkles 

A message from your friendly PEER Rangers!

For all of those who don't know who we are, we are an arm of the Red Earth Rangers with specialist skills and experience in dealing in difficult emotional and stressful situations during the event. PEER stands for Psychological and Emotional Emergency Response. We provide crisis intervention to members of Red Earth City during times of distress to help a participant return to the event safely and with improved clarity. It was developed as a pro-active, rather than reactive initiative for all citizens of Red Earth City.

With LESS THAN 100 DAYS  to go before the gates open, you will be receiving regular updates from the PEERs and Red Earth Rangers over the coming weeks to help you understand our role on the paddock, in case you need a Ranger at the event.

The PEER Rangers love communication and we believe that it's the best lubrication, especially when used in intimate relationships.  Check out this awesome video on what healthy communication looks like in romantic relationships.

(Seeing healthy communication between fellow burners - whether on or off the paddock, get the PEERs and Rangers juices flowing with excitement.)

RANGER PEER PURPLE

New Sanctuary Space at Seed 

This year, Burning Seed is introducing a new safe space, designed to provide somewhere for participants to chill out and process any difficult experiences. Keep an eye out for more info on the new Sanctuary space, as we will be putting out a community call out for volunteers for this space too.

If you would like to join the awesome Red Earth Rangers or the PEER Rangers this year, please sign up at our Community Crew page.

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Photography, film and media rego now open

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]R[/bra_dropcaps]egistration to photograph, film or publish about Burning Seed opens is now open. At Burning Seed, our approach to media, photography and filming is different from standard festivals, so check whether you need to register too. We also give a brief outline of your rights as a participant sans camera. 

Pics, flicks and articles for publication

If you are planning to take photographs or film for anything beyond sharing with friends and family – and that includes websites, gallery showings, traditional and digital media – then you need to seek and be granted written permission.

If you are planning to write and publish an article in a newspaper, newsletter, magazine or an online publication, you will also need to register with us too. If you are blogging for personal reasons but including photos, then we ask that you register for the photography.

At Burning Seed, we are seeking to create a radically self-expressive space where people can openly be or do anything. There is therefore a greater need at our Burn to maintain the integrity and safety of the space and its people – and for participants to know and trust that this is happening.

And that means we like to keep an eye on the media, photographers and filmmakers – professional, semi-professional and amateur. With the size of our event still intimate, we also set a limit on the number of film projects each year. That includes any remote aerial devices that film.

Maintaining the integrity of this space also means that consent should be your middle name when photographing or filming at Burning Seed. Wherever possible, check in with the subject of your camera’s desire, either before or after the shot, to see if they’re Ok with being captured.

Consent wristbands will also be available for participants to wear and to let you know at a glance whether they want to be in the frame — read more here.

And last but not least, there are no media passes. In a participatory community such as ours, you’re part of it too. So, yes, you must buy a ticket.

Burningseed

Pics, flicks and articles for friends and family

For your average participant who just wants to share their memories with friends and family, we still have three words for you: consent, consent, consent

Whether you’re a newcomer or not, you might not know what is acceptable until you ask. By asking, you’ll eliminate confusion and foster a tighter, safer community where people know their boundaries are protected and respected. In a world where people are pushing the envelope of their own self-expression (or perhaps wanting to explore somebody else’s :)), such freedom is only assured by knowing you are safe to do so.

Remember: photographs might seem like a good idea at the time but radical self-expression can look quite different out of its natural habitat and splashed all round Facebook for employers, family members and others to see. Not everyone wants to blend their Burner life with their default world – some people need or want to keep these lives separate. So don’t out a Burner by taking that photo or video without checking in with them!

If you’re blogging, we ask that you keep us in the loop by sending a link to media@burningseed.com

Participants

And for the participant without a camera? You have the right to ask a photographer or videographer at any time not to take a picture of you and to ask them to delete it if they do.

Removable, brightly coloured silicone consent wristbands are also available for you to wear: they are a quick and easy way to let all photographers and filmmakers know that you don’t want to be filmed or photographed for the whole of the event or just the times or days that you don’t want to be captured on film.

 

 

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Consent wristbands: shorthand for no pics or flicks

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]W[/bra_dropcaps]e’re introducing optional consent wristbands to help participants and photographers/filmmakers alike navigate the sometimes tricky task of seeking and giving consent around photographs and videos at Burning Seed.

Wanna just let it all hang out — literally, figuratively, hell any way you want at the Burn? Don’t want to worry about being photographed or having to police whether someone is snapping you without having that all-important “ is it OK” conversation? Are you just having one of those days when you don’t want to be the object of somebody else’s art?

Or are you a photographer, filmmaker or videographer who scratches their head over this whole asking-consent-questions stuff ‘cause the magic is in the moment of capturing that shot?

The consent bracelets are designed to help all of you. These are brightly coloured, removable silicon wristbands with “NO PHOTOS OR VIDEOS” written on them. They will allow participants to easily signal when they don’t want to be captured on film, and it will give photographers, filmmakers and videographers a clearer sign of whether someone definitely doesn’t want to be photographed or filmed. #respecttheband

But that doesn’t mean we want you stop talking to each other either.

We still encourage you all to have that consent conversation wherever possible (before or after the pic) — especially if someone is not wearing a bracelet and in the middle of a private moment, exposed and/or vulnerable position, naked or any other situation that may require checking in.

A consent bracelet is an automatic red light to not photograph or film the person in question. But a blank wrist is not an automatic green light to film or photograph: check in whenever possible.

Wristbands will be available at the event entrance and also at Red Earth Info.