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Consent wristbands: shorthand for no pics or flicks

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]W[/bra_dropcaps]e’re introducing optional consent wristbands to help participants and photographers/filmmakers alike navigate the sometimes tricky task of seeking and giving consent around photographs and videos at Burning Seed.

Wanna just let it all hang out — literally, figuratively, hell any way you want at the Burn? Don’t want to worry about being photographed or having to police whether someone is snapping you without having that all-important “ is it OK” conversation? Are you just having one of those days when you don’t want to be the object of somebody else’s art?

Or are you a photographer, filmmaker or videographer who scratches their head over this whole asking-consent-questions stuff ‘cause the magic is in the moment of capturing that shot?

The consent bracelets are designed to help all of you. These are brightly coloured, removable silicon wristbands with “NO PHOTOS OR VIDEOS” written on them. They will allow participants to easily signal when they don’t want to be captured on film, and it will give photographers, filmmakers and videographers a clearer sign of whether someone definitely doesn’t want to be photographed or filmed. #respecttheband

But that doesn’t mean we want you stop talking to each other either.

We still encourage you all to have that consent conversation wherever possible (before or after the pic) — especially if someone is not wearing a bracelet and in the middle of a private moment, exposed and/or vulnerable position, naked or any other situation that may require checking in.

A consent bracelet is an automatic red light to not photograph or film the person in question. But a blank wrist is not an automatic green light to film or photograph: check in whenever possible.

Wristbands will be available at the event entrance and also at Red Earth Info.

 

6107

First-timer friction: the winter of Burner discontent

Written by Jayman

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]W[/bra_dropcaps]ith winter upon us and Burning Seed less than four months away, spare a thought for the Principles left out in the cold — and the potential participants.

Over the coming months, there will be lots of potential newbies/Burgins/potential participants asking questions. To some of us, these questions might seem like commonsense or basic information that people could find themselves with a bit of research (I hear the radical choir sing “radical self-reliance!!!”)

Well, here is the thing. Apparently there is more than one Principle. At last count there are nine more and some regional events have introduced 2-3 more.

The Ten Principles are learned, seen in action and experienced. Throwing one Principle at people in isolation is not the Burner way. In everything we do, we should be trying to express as many Principles in an interaction with another human being as possible.

We are building a Community, not a radicalised, exclusive hipster enclave. The very purpose of a Burn event is to prove that there is another way and take back those learnings to the outside world and transform it. We are the Revolution, by making a new world a better world.

So, the next time you pull radical self-reliance out of your back pocket (‘cause it is likely one of the main two you have ready at hand), spare a thought for the other neglected Principles this winter. The Principles work all together, not in isolation.

A considerate response is a Gift of information. In the Immediacy of a sensible answer you are helping to alleviate the fear and uncertainty that a new burner might be experiencing as they make a crucial decision (either consciously or unconsciously) to join our Community.

And in answering even the simplest of questions with your beautiful and amazing Radical Self Expression in a way that does not inhibit the rights and liberties of the recipient shows Radical Inclusion and Civic Responsibility at its best.

Participate in ALL the 10 Principles to embrace new Burners.

For those newbies looking for a place to call home at Seed, Jayman runs the Orphanage Theme Camp. It’s a great way to experience the participation, gifting and community that is so integral to Seed. You can find them here.

Orphanage 2014

6087

It takes a community to build a forest

Written by Ash Blackwell

Mr wattle you will do just fine

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]N[/bra_dropcaps]ew friendships were made, ties between the local community and Seed community were strengthened and a whole lot of good dirty fun took place at the recent Red Earth Ecology biodiversity planting in Matong.

On Saturday May 2, around 30 people from all over the east coast and the Riverina came together for a weekend to plant a forest.

There was music, dancing and a whole lot of planting and watering of native plants. Not to mention Jo’s amazing home-cooked cakes and slices.

Best of all, the weekend gave the local community a chance to interact and learn more about the kind of people that get involved in Burning Seed.

I think they’re almost convinced that we aren’t a cult, and the contribution to the local environment is starting to get around.

The Red Earth Ecology project was established as part of Burning Seed’s ‘Leave No Trace’ principle.

Burning Seed is held at the Matong State Forest, and while we can pick up our litter, we cannot completely remove our impact on the forest. The Red Earth Ecology team work to develop and implement projects that leave a net positive impact on the local ecology.

Over the last two years, the team has worked with local property owners to extend and develop tree corridors on sections of their land. One of the risk factors for small birds and animals is the fragmentation of their habitat. By helping to establish corridors of local plant species, we provide food and shelter for local insects, birds and other species.

Last year we worked with local Burning Seed participant Brian Jones to extend and enrich a tree corridor on his property adjacent to the Ganmain State Forest. Unfortunately Brian Jones fell quite ill late last year (We wish him continued progress on his journey back to good health).

This year, local plant whisperer Jo Roberts reached out to other Burners in the area, who would be happy to facilitate a planting project. Dave and Sonja Currie stepped up to help and offer their property, which is just down the road from Brian.

A big green thank you to all who came and all who contributed. And a very big thanks to Jo, Maddock, Dave and Sonja who made it all possible.

                       diggin them in it takes a team to build a forrest

                       Nikki the kookaburra whisperer plants and peace

Red Earth Ecology strikes again: (clockwise from top left) diggin’ this project, the gang’s all here, Nikki the Kookaburra whisperer, peace and plants. Pics: Madeline Fountain

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Build it and they’ll actually come — the making of an info booth


[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]Y[/bra_dropcaps]ou could have knocked Scarlett over with a feather — or the merest tickle of a tutu. 
Our resident Centre Camp artist had been struggling to build our whizz-bang new info centre booth with very limited help. But then our trusty Crew Wrangling Team had it’s wicked way with her, and suddenly a dreary Melbourne Saturday morning became a hub of collaborative kickarse know-how. 

What a difference a community makes!

On 18 April, 12 people descended on Reclamation artists warehouse in Coburg to help Scarlett build a new circus-inspired booth for the Red Earth Info centre. They came. They sawed. They conquered! Oh, and they painted too.

A smaller gang of Centre Camp rockstars have since been working on the metalwork that will adorn the info booth.

Check out some of the pics below.

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Wanna tap into your inner Flashdance and help weld? Or are you gagging for a hit of sawdust? Jump on Centre Camp’s Facebook page or contact our Crew Wranglers via our Community Crew page.

 

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Kraken’s TENtacle moment with Wiradjuri

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]T[/bra_dropcaps]he writing is on the wall — Kamp Kraken has stretched its tentacular theme camp presence beyond the confines of the Paddock and shown how to make Burning Seed more than just one week in a land far far away.

For the past two years, Kraken has donated 10% of what it has fundraised during that year to a chosen charity. The Theme Camp kicked off this initative in 2013 with a donation to the Wiradjuri wall project, which was recently completed and unveiled.

Birth of an idea

The idea was first proposed by one of the Krew, dashing Dan Ducrou, who hopes to see more Theme Camps do the same.

“I proposed the idea in recognition of the fact that many of the wonderful people who make up Kamp Kraken want to make a positive impact on the people and communities around them. We are so lucky to have the time, freedom and access to resources that we do – why not harness a portion of this abundance and feed it back into the local community?” says Dan.

“I hope this is something other Theme Camps pick up on in their own fundraising ventures. Burning Seed is such an enriching, revitalising, delicious experience for all of us – we all get so much out of it – how easy and rewarding it can be to give back.”

Enter the Wiradjuri project

The Wiradjuri wall was a local community project that involved Wiradjuri elders and youth producing a public artwork in the heart of the Narrandera township.  The wall was a way to honour the Aboriginal cultural history of Narrandera shire and create a beautiful public space where special musical and cultural performances could occur.

Why did Kraken decide to share this particular TENtacle moment with the Wiradjuri project?

“We chose to support the Wiradjuri Memorial Wall out of respect for the Traditional Owners, the Wiradjuri, on whose land Burning Seed takes place. We wanted to support something that involved local community members, something that would have lasting impact and something that elevated recognition of the Wiradjuri in the Narrandera township,” says Dan.

“We also flew the Aboriginal flag above Kamp Kraken for the duration of the event – the flag was given to me by a Wurundjeri Elder (Traditional Owner of the greater Melbourne area) in the lead up to Burning Seed – and presented the following hand written note to the Wiradjuri Elder who Welcomed us onto his country.”

Today, we are meeting, partying, dancing and sleeping on the traditional lands of the Wiradjuri. For this we give thanks and pay our respects.

In being here, we acknowledge and are sorry for the deep hurt and suffering caused by white settlement.

We are sorry for the loss of language and culture, for the children taken from families under racist government policies, and for the cultural disinterest of broader Australia. We are sorry for the ongoing disparity between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians that is born of structural exclusion, racism, dispossession and indifference.

We visit Wiradjuri country in the spirit of friendship. We hope to be part of a healing generation that openly acknowledges past wrongs, whilst searching for ways to build positive relationships and contribute to the local community.

In line with this year’s Burning Seed theme of ‘Re:Creation’, Kamp Kraken is proud to be contributing $800 to the Wiradjuri Memorial Wall – a local community project that will see Wiradjuri Elders and youth produce a public artwork in the heart of the Narrandera township.

This money was gathered through Kamp Kraken fundraising efforts in Melbourne, in the lead up to Burning Seed 2013.

Thank you for hosting us.

With love,

Kamp Kraken

5914

Melburn Town Hall: reporting for duty, sah!

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]T[/bra_dropcaps]he recent Melburn Town Hall (April 14) was another great chance for well-done Burners and rare to medium-rare Burgins to bring their ideas and questions to this awesome community forum about all things Seed and burnery. 

Town Halls are run by Burning Man regional contacts in both Sydney and Melbourne on a quarterly(ish) basis, and are a way for the Burner community to spend some face-to-face time discussing issues and brainstorming ideas for their local community.

Crowdcreation of our imagination

One of the most popular topics at Melburn Town Halls is Participation. It’s great to know that people are so keen to find more and new ways to bring their brains and brawn to the Burner community, particularly when no-one gets paid for this crap.

We all work, we all play and we all pay…it’s a LOVE job! There’s a huge range of skills to learn and share — gate, greeters, rangers, medical, temple, or effigy build — and Town Hall participants heard it right: this event is about unlimited creative potential, people. Don’t think about it, DO IT!!

#burneveryday

Town Hall also talked about how to participate and promote Burner initiatives outside Seed — that’s right — #burneveryday! So, stay informed, check out burningseed.com, join the plethora of Facebook groups, tell your mum you’re going to Burning Pub whether she likes it or not and you won’t be back for dinner! Whether you want to participate locally or interstellarly, there’s something out there for you.

There were some practical questions and answers too — people were keen to find out why Seed starts midweek and finishes on the Monday. Answer: Well, there’s no medical onsite after Mad Monday so it’s all about keeping you folks safe. If you really wanna get in early then you can apply for an early entry pass if you’re part of a theme camp or an exhibiting artist, so get your groove on!

We love us some Theme Camps

Speaking of Theme Camps, people were also keen to learn more about them — some Theme Camps have been going since the dawn of SEED .. some are new.. some are huge and some are small.. some provide, food, booze, hugs or spanks. Yes, that’s right.. spanks, dipped in butter, with a chilli and lemon marinade…

Theme Camps, while being crazy fun, also provide fantabulous platforms for participants to experience the 10 Principles: the backbone, heart, liver, kidney etc of the Burning Man concept. You can belong to one Theme Camp, none or many. It doesn’t really matter. You can jump on board an already existing crew or go create something completely new — it’s up to you!

Tickets and traffic

OK, so there’ll be limited tickets this year, as Town Hallers heard, and this is one way that we’re looking to better manage the traffic in and out of the site, as well as maintain the sustainability of the event in general — its resources, people and culture. There’s also a rideshare page on Facebook, and if you wanna do the whole public transport thing there will be someone looking into getting a bus to do runs to the site from Wagga. We’re keen on reducing the in-and-out flow of cars from the site so keep an eye out for more news on this.

So that’s nearly the wrap on the Melbourne Town Hall. Town Hall is what you make it folks, so get along to your next one (Sydney next up in May) and make your contribution.

And over to you Sydney?

Other Melburn Town Hall conversation topics that you Sydneysiders might wanna continue include: Art Cars, YEAH!! — Making the Galah more mobile friendly? — How do we attract new artists from international Burns and take our art to other Burns? — Queensland Burn — um YAY!! (that’s happening in July folks, see this month’s Galah) — Town Planning: let’s create a foodie area so we can share resources (we like this!) — (Sad face) but we will need a new home for Seed soon, we’re growing like crazy… do you know a place we could call home when we grow up?

 

5879

Watts next for green power survey?

Written by Troy Reid and Rhys Alconley-Jones

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]B[/bra_dropcaps]urning Seed often means different things to different people. The experience can vary from integrally connective to wildly discombobulating, and whether we’re coming apart at the seams or holding it together with sass and style often comes down to the quality of connection that we have with each other, our environment, and ourselves.

The PowerCity feasibility study aimed to explore how we connect electronically. Do we stick to our petrochemical guns; atomised campsites each with generator louder and smellier than a Trash Mansion barwoman whirring till the wee hours of the morn?  Or can we share power, quite literally, and engineer a solution both by and for the community?

While the feasibility study is ongoing, the project survey component is now concluded, and we are amped to brag about what we learnt.

The nuts & bolts 

Thanks to everyone that took time to answer the survey questions. From the 58 survey responses received in total, there was overwhelming support for the proposal and all 21 theme camp organisers, art exhibitors and team leaders responded unanimously in favour of a dedicated professional team taking responsibility for power generation and distribution, because quite frankly it is a big pain in the arse.

If it proceeds, the most favoured funding model for the proposal was an increase in the event ticket price and based on the survey data we now roughly know how much electricity we need at this year’s event. For you nerdy types here are the magical numbers:

Projected power requirements: min=30kVA | avg=50kVA | max=160kVA

Projected energy requirements: 6,440kWh (liberated from 1,800L B100 BioDiesel)

Projected CO2 production/abatement required (calculated as 2.64kg of CO2/L): 4,752kg

For those interested in how these figures were arrived at, feel free to check out both the raw survey data as well as the calculations worksheet here. 

Sexy sign-ups

The survey also invited people to register interest in becoming a part of the project implementation. Here is an impressive summary of the surprising talent within our burner community that have put their hands up:  Electrical Engineer (1); Mechanical Engineer (1); Software Engineer (1); Engineering Technician (1); Licensed Electricians (3); Solar Systems Specialist (1) and Fearless Enthusiasts (7).

With a gene pool this sexy, we feel sure that the PowerCity project could easily evolve into something that shoots electrons into your next cuddle-puddle-spank-sessions, psychedelic aerobic workouts, or whatever else you freaks are into.

EmPOWERment and principle

There have been some concerns expressed that with electricity effectively ‘outsourced’, we’ll turn into an ultra-entitled out-group, demanding kilowatts and centrelink payments with no sense of, or respect for, the principle of Self-Reliance.

While this is always a possibility, the Communal Effort principle has something to say about this too. By pooling our resources and skills together, we can emPOWER our Theme Camps and Red Earth city to provide an even greater space for self-expression. And mother nature will be pretty stoked too.

Watts next I hear you ask? Well we are still in the process of validating and costing a range of competing solutions with a view to having the feasibility study completed by the end of May. So watch this space.

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Get down n dirty with Red Earth Ecology

[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]C[/bra_dropcaps]ome get dirty with a bunch of Burners — nooooooo, not that kinda dirty. Cheeky! We do that all time. Nup, we’re offering you the chance to connect with Country, learn about the district’s ecosystems and build stronger ties with the local community by joining Red Earth Ecology on another biodiversity planting weekend on 1-3 May.

Red Earth Ecology is building on the momentum and success of last year’s project by organising a biodiversity planting at a property close to the Seed site. These plantings are an annual project that help strengthen the links between Burning Seed and the surrounding land and locals.

They’re looking for about 20 community members like YOU to join the crew. Help give something back to the people and place where we play, leave a positive trace, have fun and connect with other Burners towards a common goal. No, not BACON (although there will be plenty of that) – BIODIVERSITY! For a little sneaky squiz, check out the pics from last time.

This year the team will also work with skilled-up Burners to assess the Carbon footprint of Burning Seed 2015 so that we can offset our emissions accurately next year. Red Earth Ecology is also increasing its visibility this year at Seed, with MORE bush walks (which conveniently end at Red Earth Brewery during happy hour), and MORE education about the Red Earth City ecosystem online and at site.

For more information, contact maddock.helios@gmail.com

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Call to care action — Matong Burner needs our support

10997176_782903998446092_4429033221212887762_o[bra_dropcaps style=’dropcap2′]B[/bra_dropcaps]rian Jones is a much-loved Matong local and Burner who has been an enthusiastic and vital support person for Seed, donating his time, heavy machinery and good will from the get go! Now he needs our support too.

At the start of this year, Brian developed Guillain-Barre syndrome, a very rare auto-immune reaction following a throat infection, which causes rapid paralysis. Within a week he went from working 14-hour days on the farm to not being able to walk at all, nor use his hands. With daily physio the recovery time is between six months to two years on average.

Brian has been at Wagga Wagga Base Hospital since the new year, first in intensive care and now the rehab unit. He is recovering at a best-case scenario pace, and his mental and emotional health are strong. He’s focused, determined and positive. Even so, he is likely to be in hospital for several more months, re-learning how to walk.

Let’s help him to stay positive and feel connected to our community. If you can find some spare time, please send Brian a letter, card, drawing, distraction, words of encouragement, or something else that you can think of. Thanks!

The Address:

Brian Jones
Wagga Wagga Base Hospital
Rehab Unit
PO Box 159
Wagga Wagga
NSW 2650