10890

New Members for Burning Seed Town Council!!

Recently we announced vacancies for the Burning Seed Town Council (BSTC).  The BSTC is in place as an interim group to support the Burning Seed event Team Leads and facilitate the process for a new stand-alone Burning Seed legal entity.  

It’s important to note that the BSTC plays a complementary role alongside the Team Leads and we consider all the volunteers involved in making Burning Seed happen as playing an equally important role in producing an extraordinary event for all of us.

We were all very pleased with the response from the community and the high calibre of the five candidates who nominated themselves.  

The process involved the applicants submitting their nomination with background and experience, interviews with the candidates and then a final assessment of the candidates by the existing BSTC members.

After careful consideration of all the candidates, we are pleased to announce two new Town Councillors who are proposed to join the BSTC.

Ali Mohammad Shams Ahmadi is a founding member of the Middle Eastern Mafia theme camp at Burning Seed since 2013 and an active member of the Melbourne burner community.

Rennie Sinclair-Kydd, who might be known to many people through involvement with the Alien Welcoming Committee (AWC) theme camp since the early beginnings of Burning Seed in Matong and is also an active member of the Wagga Wagga and Canberra burner communities.

In addition to the BSTC roles that were available, we have also offered Susanne Parris the opportunity to support the BSTC with essential administration activities such as minutes, scheduling meetings, tracking agreed actions and facilitating comms with Team Leads through a Secretariat role.  

Suzanne is an active member of the Sydney burner community and has also been a passionate participant at Seed since 2014.

Our congratulations to Susanne, Ali and Rennie and we look forward to working with all the other candidates in the future.  

We will be on-boarding the new BSTC members over the coming weeks.  We are very excited to have their new energy and particularly look forward to having three of the seven current BSTC members actively involved in representing theme camps at Burning Seed.

Burn Bright!

Victoria, Shaye, Neil, Phil and Jayman - Burning Seed Town Councillors

Ali Mohammad Shams Ahmadi

Ali Mohammad Shams Ahmadi

Rennie Sinclair-Kydd

Rennie Sinclair-Kydd

Susanne Parris

Susanne Parris

10906

Acknowledging Country

by Niki and Pete (Wiradjuri mob)

I would like to acknowledge the Wiradjuri people who are the traditional custodians of this land. I would also like to pay respect to the elders past and present of the Wiradjuri nation and extend that respect to other Aboriginal people present.

The Matong State Forest is Wiradjuri country, and here at Burning Seed we recognize the privilege of  being able to build our experimental community each year on this beautiful site. We feel we should not ignore the existence and ownership of this land by Aboriginal people before European settlement and acknowledge the history within the ritual of 'Welcome to Country', the ceremony performed each year at Red Earth City to formally launch the event.

Welcome to Country & Acknowledgement of Country

‘Welcome to Country’ is an important ceremony by Aboriginal people and it helps non-Indigenous people recognize Aboriginal culture and history and make connections with country. With Welcome to Country, Elders pay respect to custodians past and present as well as Elders past and present.

Before European settlement, despite the absence of fences or visible borders, Aboriginal groups had clear boundaries separating their country from that of other groups. Crossing into another group’s country required a request for permission to enter. When that permission was granted the hosting group would welcome the visitors, offering them safe passage

Spiritually, this is showing respect for the country and the custodians who are responsible for taking care of the country where we live… So what our custodians are doing is trying to give respect back into the country.

Respecting Tradition

It was the tradition of Aboriginals that when strangers came into their particular country to hunt or to gather, or to just pass through on their way to other places, that the host Aboriginals would go out to welcome them. When they met, there would be the formalities of greeting. Part of the ceremony of welcome would be the men sitting around and talking men’s business (share knowledge and lore) whilst the host women would take the visiting women and children to a women’s site to talk women’s business.

When this was completed, the two groups would join again and the men would trade and hunt for kangaroo, goannas or bush turkey - and the women would prepare an area for eating and would gather firewood and berries, fruit, nuts and lily roots for a meal.

Dancing, Singing, Leaving No Trace (sound familiar!?)

Then the ceremonies, the corroborees dancing would commence, the singing songs around the fire could well go on, not only all night, but sometimes for many nights in a row. Each with a message within their own stories. Men, women and children all taking part. Whilst during the day, the visiting tribe would be taken and shown the sites of significance and be told the stories of the spirit of the land they would be passing.

In this way, the hosts believed that by the end of formalities, when the strangers were ready to move on they would not be considered not strangers but friends who now had the spirit of the country in their heart. They believed that once the spirit of the land was in their hearts, then those people would never damage the land they would love it and care for it like those whose home country it was…

History

A Welcome to Country is about Aboriginal people acknowledging the past, and looking to the future. It is often delivered by an Aboriginal person who has themselves been the victim of government policies.

Our Elders do the Welcome to Country as an act of generosity. These are the same people who have had their children taken away, or been removed themselves. They’re the same people who had their wages stolen by successive governments. They’re the same people who had their ancestors’ remains raided by grave robbers. They’re the same people who were disposed from their lands and forced on to missions and reserves.

And yet despite all of these terrible events and the horrendous treatment by so many parliaments, these very same people are still prepared to say ‘welcome’ to the very people who in some cases have presided over the oppression.

We encourage everyone to come along and join in to the ceremonies, to be welcomed, feel loved and pay our respects to Country. Still today we all have Knowledge to share for a better future.

Niki and Pete 

Pete tending the Sacred Fire at Welcome to Country in 2015

Pete tending the Sacred Fire at Welcome to Country in 2015 (photo: Ryan McRobb)

Yindyamarra Circle near First Camp at Seed 2015

Yindyamarra Circle near First Camp at Seed 2015

The Sacred Fire (photo: Ryan McRobb)

The Sacred Fire (photo: Ryan McRobb)

10706

Burning Seed Town Council Needs More Members!

Burning Seed Town Council is the organising 'Board' responsible for staging Burning Seed. Due to a member stepping down recently, there are now TWO vacancies on the Burning Seed Town Council and interested members of the community (that's YOU!) are invited to apply to join!

What's Involved?

If you're interested in helping steer Burning Seed into the future and you have experience in event or project management your talents are needed! You'll need to make a commitment to join the monthly meetings and dedicate at least a few hours each month to directing that lovely brain of yours to all things Burning Seed.  

If you'd like to get involved and want to find out more please read the Issues to consider before standing for Burning Seed Town Council document and email towncouncil@burningseed.com with your details.

What's the Background?

The BSTC reports to the Directors of Red Earth City Pty Ltd, the company that stages Burning Seed each year. Red Earth City Pty Ltd has been the legal entity behind Burning Seed since 2010. Until last year the Red Earth City Town Council oversaw Burning Seed event and supported other Burner initiatives under the banner of Burning Man Australia, all on behalf of the Red Earth City Board of Directors.

Back in December 2015, the Directors of Red Earth City Pty decided it was time to make some governance changes before important issues related to the event's sustainability and growth could be addressed. So the Red Earth City Town Council was split into two separate bodies:

1) a group to drive forward the staging of the Burning Seed event, its future growth and development; and

2) a separate group focused on developing Burner culture around Australia - (remember although Seed was the earliest Aussie Burn a few more have spawned since then including Modifyre in Queensland and Blazing Swan in Western Australia).

OK, so these two new groups that were created last year are the Burning Seed Town Council AND the Burning Man Australia Community Board. The new structure looks something like this...

Why Change?

Burning Seed is going through some major changes right now. The event's tremendous growth in numbers in recent years has given much to think about in terms of how Burning Seed moves forward on a number of counts.

What's exciting is, for the first time, Burning Seed has a Town Council that can concentrate just on the Burning Seed event. The Burning Seed Team Leads' group keeps an operational focus while the new Burning Seed Town Council has a broader focus on securing a sustainable future for the event.

In December, an interim Burning Seed Town Council was set up to get things moving with the goal to research and consult the community on the best options for a new legal entity under which Burning Seed can operate in the years ahead. The positions on the current, interim Town Council include:

  • One Red Earth City (REC) Director: Phil Smart;
  • Nominees from Team Leads and the former REC Town Council: Jarred Taylor, Victoria Vickery and Neil Power;
  • Ex-officio member: Shaye Harty (Event Coordinator) 

This Town Council WILL change and is technically only temporary until they figure out the new entity for Seed in the future.

Get Involved!

Two positions are now available on the Burning Seed Town Council and they'd love to hear from those in the community who want to help achieve all these goals, and who (preferably) have time and experience in event management and development - if you'd like to get involved and want to find out more the read the Issues to consider before standing for Burning Seed Town Council document and email towncouncil@burningseed.com with your details.

Town Council

Our structure: Any artists out there wanna make this look purdy?

Town Council

Where it all began - at the Bellingen Seed in 2010

Town Council

Still welcoming you home in 2016

10655

In Your EARS! Red Earth Radio FM!

Those Red Earth renegades of the airwaves are back!! That's right, Red Earth Radio FM will be coming in your ears at Burning Seed: Deep Space! AND YOU CAN LISTEN TO IT LIVE RIGHT NOW!!

Some seriously intergalactic plans for RERfm broadcasts this year - including the creation of a SpacePort to house a new studio and (with any luck) a live stream via Burning Man Information Radio - taking the Paddock straight to the furthest reaches of the universe!!

Those degenerate DJs have also got more down to earth issues to deal with - like paying for a legit ACMA FM license, a new 10 meter FM transmitter and antenna, streaming costs and a secure custom built, weather proof studio space to house their ear-based gear.

Burning Seed is splashing a little cash to the tune of $1100 towards securing some much needed hardware in 2016 - this is vital infrastructure for Seed that can be used well into the future.

Pledge

Now YOU have the chance to get in on the ground floor and stake your claim for some sweet RERfm schwag!! (and you get to help this motley crew bring their peculiar face-for-radio talents to Seed...)

Help the RERfm crew cover their rears before they come in your ears. Splash some cash on their Pozible campaign before 20 July and pledge to help set up a stellar studio at Deep Space and reward yourself with a (very) limited edition RERfm T-shirt and/or hoodie!

Give as little as $10 or as much as $120 and get access to heaps of rewards and radio love! Pledged or planning to pledge? Swing by the RERfm studio at Seed for some extra special live on-air ear candy!

Crew

Wanna crew for RERfm in 2016? They need techies, DJs, talkshow hosts, weather consultants - the works! Theme Camps! Join RERfm immediately (like NOW) on the DJ roster, contact: redearthradiofm@gmail.com to receive your online DJ account and start uploading eargasms all over the Burner community

Support YOUR local radio station! Check out RERfm on Facebook or email: redearthradiofm@gmail.com

Read more about RERfm's adventures on the Paddock last year in the Afterburn Report.

 

Radio Gaga

Red Earth Radio

Hoodie Radio

10586

Welcome to… The Watershed

The beautiful brains behind Splash Mansion are set to revolutionize the way Theme Camps manage their water on the Paddock... Trash Mansionite Professor Johnny Breakwell is not just a pretty face. That brilliant mind of his has been working overtime on ways to:

  1. make it wetter down there on the Paddock,
  2. help Theme Camps Leave No Trace AND
  3. give back to the local community in Matong and surrounds!

Making a Splash
In 2013 he created Splash Mansion: “It got me out from behind the bar at Trash”, says Johnny, “and for the cost of an hour or two each day it meant we got showers, kept cool and had some awesome fun.

“Splash grew bigger in 2014/15 and we ended up doing daily water runs - it made me think about how much water we were going through, not just our camp but others too,” he says.

Then at Seed in 2015 Johnny met Rowan Kos and these two legends got talking about water. Rowan suggested the idea of setting up a collective group of Theme Camps to better manage the supply of water to camps at Seed.

The Watershed
Skip to 2016 and welcome to the fruit of that conversation…. The Watershed.

This by burners, for burners, not for profit collective comprises a willing coalition on a mission to mutually obtain and distribute quality water to Theme Camps at the lowest possible price.

“This is a fantastic social enterprise,” says Johnny. “The Watershed is facilitating the purchase of a bulk amount of water for Theme Camps - something like 20,000 litres - from farmers local to the Burning Seed site at Matong.

“The farmers will donate their time and use their water licenses to sell us the water, and any profits they make after their costs are covered will go to support the local school in Ganmain.

“These little schools make a big difference in the community - any dollars we can raise make a big difference to these kids,” he says.

How it Works
Johnny says The Watershed is owned by Theme Camps that join the collective as members.

“The members are currently Splash, Sunset Island, Trash Mansion, Dirty Birds, Detox, Casbah and The Brink.

“These and potentially other Member Theme Camps will pay in advance for a water cube of 1000 litres - the cube will be delivered to them on site during set-up, and a water tanker will come by and fill it up. The empty cube will be picked up from the camp at the end of the event.

“The Watershed will bring a lot more drinking water into Theme Camps and also make a serious environmental impact on site - for instance by minimising waste packaging from water containers - no more taking empty cartons full of air home - and reducing the number of journeys needed for water runs during the event.

“But there are many other benefits - if Theme Camps know they’ll have water delivered on site they’ll have more cargo space for Theme Arts and it also gives them scope to gift more drinking water and nautical activities.

“Importantly - this is NOT about free water on the Paddock. The Watershed is only working with member Theme Camps, not individual participants. Everyone outside our Member Theme Camps will still be required to bring the necessary amount of water they need to survive for the week. This is just about providing

Making the Infrastructure Pozible
Johnny says that with stronger interest from other Theme Camps, funding is now needed to buy the water container infrastructure.

“Without some initial funding the Watershed may have to limit further memberships and have less impact than we might do in this first year.

The Watershed is running a pozible campaign right now to help cover some of these upfront costs for basic infrastructure.

“Each one of the 1000L water cubes we’ll use for distribution of the water to Theme Camps will cost about $80 to $100 and the Watershed crew will also need radios and cleaning products to sanitize the cubes,” says Johnny.

“We’re offering some sweet water-based perks for anyone who wants to donate from $1 to $10 or more - and every dollar counts to help us get this fantastic project off the ground," says Johnny.

Find out more about The Watershed or go visit the Possible campaign and donate!

 

Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 5.08.29 PM

Find out more about The Watershed

Prof. Johnny Breakwell: it's vitally important to stay fully hydrated on the Paddock... (photo: Andy Flint)

Watershed

8927

(Red) EARTH (City) HOUR – Managing Your Impact at Seed

by MOOP DADDY

Leave No Trace at Burning Seed!With Earth Hour (19 March 2016) focusing everyone’s minds on ways to Leave No Trace (or at least less trace) on this beautiful planet of ours, Burning Seed’s Leave No Trace (LNT) Team thought we’d take an opportunity to give veteran and new burners some ideas about how you can plan NOW to reduce your impact on Red Earth City, our lovely Matong State Forest home.

Top Ten Tips 

So in time-honoured tradition, here’s a few ways (in no particular order) that you can be a better Burner and minimise your impact on the environment during your visit to Burning Seed in 2016:

  1. Start planning to rideshare – we are looking at ways to better manage traffic this year, but the best way to manage traffic (and emissions!!) is for you to find a buddy or two or five and organise a rideshare. Look out for rideshare forums closer to the event.
  2. Don’t fly in – yes that’s controversial, and difficult (particularly if you live overseas). At least consider offsetting your emissions.
  3. Pack it in, pack it out – dealing with the rubbish can be the worst part of your Burn if you haven’t made plans. When we say we Leave No Trace, WE MEAN IT. Plan to take all of your smelly refuse with you when you leave (or find ways to not bring it in the first place).
  4. MOOP is what we call MATTER OUT OF PLACE. When in Red Earth City, MOOP as you go. Don’t leave it all to the end.
  5. PARTICIPATE and carry a MOOP bag with you. Look out for MOOP around Red Earth City and grab it before it gets away! Join the MOOP Troupe!
  6. Leave glitter, confetti and other microplastic crap at home. Glitter bad. Very Bad.
  7. Line-sweep your camp site when you leave. Form a line with your camp-mates and walk a grid before you depart.
  8. Use solar or rechargeable lighting and power wherever possible. Coordinate with other camps to share generator power. Collaborate!
  9. Get involved early and join the Red Earth Ecology Biodiversity Planting project next month in Matong (April 22nd–24th)
  10. The best thing you could do? DON’T COME!* It was better last year anyway 🙂

*Hmm, this is actually kinda true but we won’t hold you to it.

8853

Burning Seed 2016 – First Site Visit!!

Red Earth... but no City - YET!

Plenty of Red Earth… but no City – YET!

It begins! We’re six months out from what promises to be the best Burning Seed yet and crew from Seed’s Department of Planning and Infrastructure (DPI) made the first site visit of the year this week to check in with the local community and start making plans for site works and improvements.

Running an event like Burning Seed is no short term deal. As the event has grown (and continues to grow) over the years, much work is involved in managing that growth, being mindful of the impacts on the site and on the local community, and taking account of a range of factors that relate to our commitment to Seed as a sustainable event.

Each year brings new lessons about how the event can be improved. For instance the DPI crew spent time on site last week reviewing the situation with roadworks, with a view to expanding the space particularly around the Gatehouse to ensure adequate lanes for emergency exit and to help address the problems in 2015 of the traffic bottleneck near Gate/Greeters.

DPI crew start their journey towards Burning Seed 2016

DPI crew on the road towards Burning Seed 2016

DPI also met with the sanitation team that handled all our 85+ toilets and 70,000 litres of toilet waste last year to talk about better ways of getting the waste trucks in and out of the Paddock, and to begin consultation on any additional infrastructure needed.

The site visit also provided an opportunity for the DPI crew to meet with our friends in the local community in and around Matong to discuss more ways that we can help leverage Seed for the benefit of local people.

For example, we raised more than $3000 in funds for local schools last year with our ice sales, and there are some great new ideas and initiatives emerging for 2016, including raising funds from the local collection of garbage on departure from Seed, and potential water deliveries to site.

If you want to get involved in crew for DPI or any other team get in touch NOW with our crew wranglers by signing up on the website.

And, if you haven’t already signed up for the Red Earth Ecology planting weekend next month – 22-24 April – now is the time!

8462

Out of AfriKa(Burn)

By Helena Sheridan

I got infatuated by the concept of Burning Man in 2012. At the time I had no idea it would lead me to experience Burns on three different continents.

I didn’t realize it would suck me so deep into a culture of people so diverse, yet so similar, that I would eventually draw a (small) salary from it and get to be involved all year round in creating spectacular events and experimental communities.

DPW in Tankwa Town.... (Photo credit: Adriaan V Zyl)

DPW in Tankwa Town…. (Photo credit: Adriaan V Zyl)

In 2015 my involvement as the Coordinator of AfrikaBurn’s Department of Public Works gave me an opportunity to travel to Australia and work with Red Earth City’s Department of Planning and Infrastructure.

The setting, the faces and the accents may change, but at its core the spirit of the people, who give so much of their time to put on an event of this nature, remains the same. This is my tribe.

Same / Same, but Same, but Different

To date I’ve been lucky enough to work at Nowhere, the European regional Burn in Spain (2012 and 2013) with around 1000-1200 participants and at AfrikaBurn, the world’s biggest regional, in the Tankwa Karoo of South Africa (2013 to 2015) with numbers in the range 8000 to 11,000.

Burning Seed 2015 was a fantastic middle ground in terms of participants (3,400 or so) and I really enjoyed the sense of community I found at Red Earth City.

....meet DPI at Red Earth City

….meet DPI at Red Earth City. What is it with this crew and containers??? (photo credit: Andy Flint)

Interestingly the concerns and issues that plague the membership and the Operations Team at AfrikaBurn HQ in Cape Town also resonate with the Burning Seed team in Australia.

The rapid growth of the events, the constant need to reinforce the message of consent, conflicts between the Ten Principles, keeping everyone happy in a radically expressive environment and burn-out amongst key team members seems to be all too evident both sides of the pond.

Meeting the Challenges of Event Growth

How does a decommodified event start to pay key crew-members? To what extend do we rely on volunteerism and how does involvement not become exclusive if only certain people can afford the time to work on the event? How do we keep growing our events while making sure the culture and Principles of the movement are not lost in the influx of virgins? And at what time can we expect big sound systems to shut up for a while so we can hear the sounds of the beautiful environments in which we find ourselves?

I certainly got new insight on some of these questions during my time at Seed 2015 and I hope I provided the crew on that side with some new perspectives too.

For one thing, I was really inspired by the amount of time, money and effort the citizens of Red Earth City put into theme camps (at AfrikaBurn there are no theme camp grants and there’s a lot more focus on mutant vehicles and big artwork).

With the rascals at the Grong Grong

Helena (centre) hanging out with the Red Earth rascals at the Matong local

It did me good also to see how the communities in Sydney and Melbourne hang out, get creative and take Burner culture back to the cities where they live. Seeing how involved people get in their camps or artworks allowed me valuable perspective as someone who has always just seen the practical, infrastructure side of such creative events.

Come say Aweh

I hope more of the core crew and participants from Seed can come visit us in South Africa to see how much we do with so little. The third world (and our location 3hrs from ANYthing) certainly makes us think outside a lot of boxes and a lot more ‘McGuyvering’ is implemented.

I think our two events can learn a lot from each other and together we can all take big bold steps into the future.

I want to thank everyone who hosted me, offered me a couch, a tent, a sleeping bag, a meal, a drink, a puff, a pill, a good time. I have much admiration for the crew putting on this spectacular event without a cent to compensate the time they put in and I have made a whole lot of fantastic new friends.

Come to Tankwa Town, I will look after you!
Yours in dust and deet…. Helena

AfrikaBurn takes place between 25 April and 1 May 2016 – at the time of writing, tickets are pretty close to selling out, so get in quick.

8408

Tantalize Your Tastebuds with the Burning Seed COOKBOOK!

Burning Seed Cookbook

Spellbinding recipes…. by Burners for Burners

So you’ve heard about the dates for Burning Seed 2016 and you want to relive the experience of Burning Seed 2015 by watching this awesome video, and you’re planning to invite a few close friends over to talk about how this year will be better, but then…. what to COOK!!??

Well, for those who haven’t yet heard, those clever witches at the Burning Witches Association (BWA) have a few of their beautifully illustrated Seed Cookbooks available for purchase, as part of their fundraising efforts for Kids Camp at Burning Seed this year.

These spellbinding volumes include signature cocktails, recipes and Seed survival tips from the wonderful Theme Camps, Crew and Burners who bring the party, structure and gift of themselves to the Paddock year after year.

Make it a Night to Remember (or Forget)

Burner friends coming over you say….? How about starting the night with The Captain’s Cocktail of white rum, OJ and grenadine (Bring Your Own Cup of course)?

Next, move effortlessly into the virtually-no-prep Presidents’ Quinoa Tabbouleh (see full recipe here).

Wrap up the evening with Sunset Island’s caramel bananas with toffee sauce and, with a few more Captain’s Cocktails, you’ll be well on your way back to Matong.

And then for the morning after try a cup of Dr. Love’s famous-beyond-the-Paddock Cup of Love (yes the recipe is available!)

Get Your Copy

Sound good? Donate $25 to receive a Cookbook of your very own so you can sample these sensational Seedy delights and more. (note: please use Google Chrome browser if possible to access the Facebook shop, there are some issues with Safari browser)

Sales of the Cookbook went to support kids camp last year and all sales for the remaining copies will be directed to support Kids Camp in 2016.

Are you organising or planning a fundraiser for Burning Seed 2016? Email comms@burningseed.com with the details – we wanna hear about it!!

8310

Learn More About Red Earth Ecology

by Jo Roberts

Photo Credit: Jo Roberts

Silver, Goldust and Varnish Wattle seed

As we begin 2016, it’s a great time to pause and reflect on the past year for Red Earth Ecology with an overview of 2015’s planting, recent activity, and plans for this year’s regeneration.

Red Earth Ecology is a specialised crew which nestles cosily in the embrace of Burning Seed’s Leave No Trace Team. We provide a forum to gather and share information about the ecology of Red Earth City and the local Riverina area as well as specific plant groupings and animal associations.

We visit our beautiful forest playground throughout the year, documenting all the changes to the site’s flora and fauna, and creating reference libraries to monitor these changes over time.

In the lead up to Burning Seed we have an important role in educating Burners about how to tread more softly on the land that we all share for that wonderful week of the year, and we also run regular, and popular bush walks during the event to help give participants the opportunity to connect with the land and environment which supports Burning Seed..

Photo Credit: Jo Roberts

RJ and Narelle working in the propagation nursery

Each year, in Autumn, Red Earth Ecology works with local farmers on bush regeneration projects to increase flora biodiversity and also to provide specific types of habitat for several local bird species that are in decline.

This regeneration effort is largely driven by recognition that part of our Civic Responsibility to the community involves off-setting the biodiversity loss to the ecosystem at Red Earth City that is inevitably caused each year by the impact of us few thousand souls who participate in Burning Seed each year.

In late 2014 Red Earth Ecology began a regeneration partnership in Matong with a local farmer and Burner family David, Sonya, Rosie and Digby Spencer­ -Currie, and in May 2015, about 30 volunteers spent a weekend working

Photo Credit: Madeline Fountain

Plants ready to go into the earth..

together, planting about 2,500 seedlings of 40 varieties. Check out some of the photos from that awesome weekend.

The crew gathered were like a brains trust of diverse and fascinating knowledge. It was a great opportunity to teach each other more about the plants, animals, changing ecosystems and social history of the local area. In the evenings, we feasted, laughed, loosened, relaxed. Thank-you so much to our hosts, to those Burners who travelled up to 8 hours to be there, to the locals and the Wiradjuri community for their gracious hospitality and participation.

About half of the plants we source each year are grown at cost, in the Brucedale Community Nursery and Seed Bank outside Wagga Wagga, managed by me, Jo Roberts, and my father Keith. In the late Spring following Burning Seed last year we spent time seed collecting, focusing on Acacias and other hard seeded local natives, and battling hoards of ants for the nutrient rich booty, which we then planted during a small working bee in December.

This year we are continuing to plant on the same land, extending last years plantings, and beginning on some new goals for 2016 and beyond.

We’ll be holding another bush regeneration planting weekend on 22-24 April 2016. If you want to get involved sign up on the event page on Facebook.