7713

Health update — Burning Seed 2015

burning seed_2015-20

Photo by Jorgenn

Hey folks,

If you’ve spent any time on Facebook since leaving the Paddock, you might have seen a few posts from people not feeling so great health-wise after Burning Seed.

We had a big boost in population this year to around 3500 souls, and as Seed grows, the risk of contracting something nasty increases too. This includes colds, flus, tummy bugs etc.

To support good communal hygiene and community health, the following measures were put in place this year:

  • twice-daily toilet cleaning
  • hand sanitation
  • advice in the guides
  • a 24-hr medical crew.

However, every participant has a responsibility for ensuring that our Burn remains healthy and safe.

This includes following hygiene rules around the storage, cooking and sharing of food; making sure that you limit exposure to other participants if you are sick; checking in with others if you have doubts about their health and are sharing food, drinks, smooches or more; and making sure that the water you drink or swim in is clean.

If you have any further ideas for improving health and hygiene on the Paddock, please contact us and get involved. jointhecrew@burningseed.com

Meningococcal update

Keep calm and carry onThe one confirmed meningococcal case at Burning Seed 2015 is doing well, and all their campmates have tested negative.

Post-event, another participant was identified with the meningococcal antibody but did not have any symptoms. The doctors said there was no risk of this participant having infected others at the event, and there was no further cause for concern.

At this stage there is only one confirmed, isolated case of meningococcal and one person who was asymptomatic. There is no ‘outbreak’ or ‘deadly scare’.

Some people are suffering the effects of working and playing hard, and sharing and caring together. The flu always sucks, and taking care of yourself is a priority. That includes checking in with your doctor if you are concerned in any way.

However, at this post-event stage, and given the relatively short incubation cycle of meningococcal, the possibility of another case is very low.

According to the Meningitis Centre of Australia: “The incubation period (the time it takes to develop the first symptoms of a disease from when a person was first exposed to an organism) for meningococcal disease is usually between two and ten days.”

Posted in Blog, News.